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Posts Tagged ‘frank perry’

Nightfall #37: “Breaking Point”

Jayne EastwoodThe last of Max Ferguson's scripts for the series and an extremely creepy one. I didn't see the twist ending coming at all.

Also the first of four appearances by actress Jayne Eastwood (photo left).

 

 


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Breaking Point

Air Date: 5/1/81
Writer(s): Max Ferguson
Production Location: CBC Toronto
Producer: Bill Howell
Featuring: Jayne Eastwood, John Stocker, Ken James, David Hendlin, Frank Perry, David Calderisi
Commercial Synopsis: A little murder at the circus…and it's the best trick in the show.


If you like what you hear, please contact the CBC Shop and encourage them to release the series!

Nightfall #23: “Where Does the News Come From?”

August SchellenbergThis week's episode asks the very relevant-to-today question: "Who actually controls what news we see and hear?"

August Schellenberg (photo left) — in his second of two NIGHTFALL appearances — stars as foreign news correspondent David Winston, returning from Rome to be offered a national news anchor position, replacing a friend who inexplicably walked off the set one night and into a padded cell. But once he arrives, Winston is confronted by the strange, conspiracy-laden tales of a long-time friend, Stella Parsons (singer/actor Peggy Mahon, in her only NIGHTFALL role).

This episode also marks the first of nine NIGHTFALL appearances by the distinctively-voiced David Calderisi as producer Martin Grant. David is probably better known to CBC Radio Drama fans as the Voice of Introduction for the post-NIGHTFALL series, Vanishing Point.

Also featured are series regulars Frank Perry, Elva Mai Hoover and John Stocker, providing a number of extra voices.

This was the only episode written by actor James D. (Jimmy) Morris ("Welcome to Homerville", "Baby Doll").


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Where Does the News Come From?

Air Date: 12/05/80
Writer(s): James D. Morris
Production Location: CBC Toronto
Producer: Bill Howell
Featuring: August Schellenberg, Peggy Mahon, David Calderisi, John Stocker, Elva Mai Hoover, Frank Perry, Trish Allen
Commercial Synopsis: A foreign correspondent returns home to take the national TV news anchorman's slot, and discovers some mysterious events which somehow never end up on the air.


If you like what you hear, please contact the CBC Shop and encourage them to release the series!

Nightfall #20: “The Blood Countess, Pt. 1: Blood Red”

Kate ReidWell, what can I say about this episode? It's the only two-parter in the entire run of the series and boy does it take advantage of the extra length!

This is the story – based on historical records and legends – of Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed (Báthory Erzsébet), the so-called Blood Countess of Hungary. The episode was written by playwright Ray Canale (his only one for NIGHTFALL) and featured veteran stage and screen actress Kate Reid (photo left) as Countess Báthory.

Canale said to me, in a 2004 telephone interview, that he had written the story with Kate Reid in mind, but was told that it would be impossible to get her. Undaunted, he drove to her Toronto home one night and left the script on her doorstep. After reading it, she contacted Bill Howell and asked to play the part. Apparently she loved the script and the opportunity to play such an infamous character.

The cast for the episode reads like a Who's Who of NIGHTFALL actors: Alan Scarfe as the husband, Count Ferencz Báthory, whose death is the impetus for his wife's heinous crimes. Ruth Springford as Dorattya Semtész, Elizabeth's life-long housekeeper, who unwillingly assists in her Lady's madness. Elva Mai Hoover as Darvulia, a local witch who serves the Countess with her efforts to make contact with her dead husband's spirit. And many more.

In this, the first part of the story, we see the Countess' madness begin to take shape after her husband is killed in battle. She has young girls brought to the castle as servants, only to have them slaughtered and their blood used in rituals designed to break the barrier between this world and the next and allow the Countess to speak with her husband. After which, she bathes in their blood to soften her skin and retain her youth. Suspicion in the village below the castle grows as more and more young women disappear from the countryside. But the local Magistrate turns a deaf ear to the peasantry, aware of his position and his duty to the Countess.

Probably the most disturbing sequence in the story – and whether this is based on fact or legend I don't know – is a mechanical girl created by a clockmaker friend of Dorattya's. On the surface, the device seems merely like an amusement for her Highness: a life-like young woman that can stand and move her arms, as if to embrace a person. But when a servant girl thought dead is returned to the castle by the Magistrate's order, she has Dorattya demonstrate the device's true purpose…

A word of warning: this episode, while not as gruesome as "The Repossession", is still very disturbing. Listener discretion is advised!


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The Blood Countess, Pt. 1: Blood Red

Air Date: 11/14/80
Writer(s): Ray Canale (based on the life and legend of Countess Elizabeth Bathory)
Production Location: CBC Toronto
Producer: Bill Howell
Featuring: Kate Reid, Ruth Springford, Elva Mai Hoover, Alan Scarfe, Robert Christie, John Stocker, Frank Perry, Hugh Webster, Mary Pirie, Nicky Guadagni
Commercial Synopsis: The most horrifying vampire of all. The most depraved ritual ever. A Transylvanian countess who bathed in the blood of virgins to keep herself young. She lived… and her name was Elizabeth Bathory.  (DHPA)


If you like what you hear, please contact the CBC Shop and encourage them to release the series!

Nightfall #17: “Last Visit”

Gerard Parkes

Here is yet another episode involving people lost while driving. However, the couple in this story have more to worry about than where they left the Chevette.

On their way to their daughter's to meet their new grandson, the Lundens (Nonnie Griffin and Frank Perry) are forced by the terrible Newfoundland fog to stop at the Eternity Cove Hotel and Lounge. Eternity Cove: where the mirrors and the fog play tricks on you and the population seems to be made up of just one man.

Gerard Parkes (photo left), better know to many people as Doc on the American version of the Muppet series Fraggle Rock, plays the mysterious Tom, the innkeeper. And the hitchhiker. And the RCMP desk officer.


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Last Visit

Air Date: 10/24/80
Writer(s): Ray Will
Production Location: CBC Toronto
Producer: Bill Howell
Featuring: Frank Perry, Nonnie Griffin, Gerard Parkes
Commercial Synopsis: The Newfoundland coast and a couple in a car in the fog late at night combine to create some terrifying circumstances in this bizarre play, especially when the couple meets a recurring stranger.  (NPR)


If you like what you hear, please contact the CBC Shop and encourage them to release the series!

Nightfall #16: “Buried Alive”

Buried Alive - Durkin-Hayes Paperback Audio coverThis is John Graham's fourth contribution to the series, though the best of his episodes is yet to come.

In this story, Don Franks portrays The Great Santini, a hypnotist with a daring plan to defraud his insurance company of $500,000 by faking his own death and allowing himself to be buried alive. Unfortunately for Santini, his two assistants have no intention of digging him up.

In this production, Bill Howell returns to using some of the interstitial music that made "Welcome to Homerville" so intense. He also employs some very creepy modernized organ music of the style heard in many old-time radio shows.

"Buried Alive" is one of 30 or so episodes that made their way into the Durkin-Hayes Paperback Audio cassette series (image left) back in the 90s.


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Buried Alive

Air Date: 10/17/80
Writer(s): John Graham
Production Location: CBC Toronto
Producer: Paul Mills
Featuring: Don Franks, Lally Cadeau, John Stocker, Frank Perry
Commercial Synopsis: The Magnificent Santini enters a deep trance, is declared dead, the insurance company pays – and he splits the money with his wife. It's a great plan, if she digs him up after the funeral. Santini's been down there for a while and nothing's happened. Maybe she's got ideas of her own.   (DHPA)


If you like what you hear, please contact the CBC Shop and encourage them to release the series!

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